It’s All About The Props

Posted: October 11, 2009 by Salvatore Otoro in Character Development, MV-SL-Tutorials, Roleplay 101

Demons Left to Right: Fran, Orchid, Avian, Sakura, Sindee, and Unwordly

Demons Left to Right: Fran, Orchid, Avian, Sakura, Sindee, and Unwordly

Recently, my role play character took a turn for the worse.  My character is having an identity crisis as the one host splits into two hosts; the original host Salvatore and another more sinister and much darker host Sindee.  Sindee is the part of Salvatore that spent most of the time as Jyorogumo, the Oni spider demon, in Japan.  It is why she speaks Japanese.  At times when she is present, she will start speaking in Japanese whatever it is she wants to say.  If you are a Japanese speaker you will understand what she is saying because it is not gibberish but real sentences and words.

Lets stop right there. I don’t speak Japanese.  I don’t understand any of it nor do I speak it a little.  My languages are English and Spanish.  I might understand and know a wee bit of Italian and Portuguese, but that’s it.  So how do I manage to do this?  I did some research prior to starting this new phase of my character.  I went to Google and searched for English to Japanese translators.  Google has one, however, it translates English to the Japanese Symbols.  In fact, all online translators do that.  Further investigation into the phonetic translation of the Japanese language showed me that it is called Romanji.  Romanji is the phonetic translation of the Japanese symbols which allows you to read it and pronounce it.

My next step was to open two windows or tabs; one with Google translate English to Japanese symbols and the other with an online translator that does Japanese symbols to Romanji.  When I get the Romanji translation, I copy and paste that into my chat.  Now anyone that cares to read it and understands it can do so, while those that do not understand it can at least read it.  My reason for explaining this is so that if you do have a character that is fluent in a language which you in real life are not knowledgeable about, you can still do it and get away with it.  Google translate is not a 100% translation but is good enough to get by.  I hope this helps you all increase your creativity with your role play.  Just about anything is possible if you research it beforehand.

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Comments
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  2. Another solution would be to simply use a translation HUD like Q-Translator.

  3. It does not do Romanji, however your own chat would be visible in English as well (unless you use the secret channel), so your co-players have the English, not the immersion is still there with Japanese.

    • This is something I was discussing with another player this morning. In the current role play I’m doing, I speak Japanese more as a way to denote changes I’m going through as opposed to using it for all my role play. I do it because they don’t understand me and so it brings up the fact that something is wrong with me among other changes. I intentionally want them to not understand me unless they know the language as it is more realistic in what I’m trying to achieve.

      It would be different if I were trying to do all my role play in Japanese. We get new players all the time that are, for example, native French or Spanish speakers. They need a translator because their entire role play would be not be understandable to us. Whereas, I emote in English while speaking in Japanese. I don’t speak it all the time but it is something that comes and goes depending on what changes my character is experiencing. My role play, though, is fully in English.

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